Latest Posts

Habits of a Savvy Saving Family

by Stacy Brasher on Mar 7, 2019

When people warn you that having kids is expensive, it’s no joke. From diapers to food, braces to sports activities the costs add up quick. For a middle-income family in the U.S. raising a child up until age 18, costs an estimated average of $245,340 (or $304,480, adjusted for projected inflation), according to the 2013 “Cost of Raising a Child” report from the U.S.

High Net Worth Families Need a Complete Risk Management Plan

by Stacy Brasher on Mar 4, 2019

Because there isn’t a one-size-fits-all plan that could possibly fit the unique needs of every family, risk management is a process that focuses on the problem of risk at every level of a family’s lifestyle in order to ultimately arrive at a solution for each. Each risk calls for separate measures, which usually require separate forms of insurance.

Retained Life Estate: Open the Door to Tax Charitable Deductions

by Stacy Brasher on Feb 28, 2019

A home is a place to rest your head, to create memories, and to cook dinner. It’s where your pets are—your family. What people most often forget about their home is that it’s also your most valuable financial asset. And, if one of your financial goals includes a testamentary gift to charity, while also receiving substantive income tax deductions, this asset is important.

New Home Financing Checklist

by Stacy Brasher on Feb 25, 2019

While owning a home is the quintessential American dream, not everyone is able to purchase a home when they desire. If you’re fresh out of school with a boat load of student debt, it’s probably best to wait until you’ve been working for at least a year before you start looking to buy. You’ll also want to make sure that your credit score is where it should be, since the higher your score, the lower your interest rate will be.

Start Saving for Retirement Today

by Stacy Brasher on Feb 14, 2019

Time certainly goes by fast. One day you’re interviewing for your first job and the next thing you know you’re a few short years from applying for Social Security.

If you’ve planned for your retirement, you’ll likely have a good stash of funds saved.  But the unfortunate news is that according to the ​Insured Retirement Institute,​ 42 percent of baby boomers have nothing saved for retirement, and even those that have saved don’t have nearly enough to survive on.